Nepal witnesses rise in COVID-19 symptomatic patients

Khabarhub

July 25, 2020

2 MIN READ

Nepal witnesses rise in COVID-19 symptomatic patients
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KATHMANDU: The symptomatic patients of COVID-19 have started coming into notice in the country.

The new infected have started showing the symptoms of COVID-19 when there were 98 percent asymptomatic patients in the beginning.

According to Epidemiology and Disease Control Division executive Dr. Basudev Pandey, the disease symptoms have started seen among the new patients.

Dry cough, breathing complications, tiredness, fatigue and loss of taste and smell, sore throat are among those symptoms that infected are showing these days.

According to him, nine out of 16 patients in the Kathmandu Valley have complained of the above-mentioned symptoms. In the beginning, most patients were asymptotic which means that they did not have the disease symptoms.

But now the symptoms are seen and it suggests the need for more alternates.

Doctors have said with the lifting of nationwide lockdown against the virus since the night of July 21, the infection risk has further increased, urging all to take safety measures.

Shukraraj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital Director Dr. Sagar Raj Bhandari said one-third among the patients admitted to the hospital are symptomatic.

According to him, eight out of 24 patients have COVID-19 symptoms. Fever, dry cough, body ache, tiredness and shortness of breath have seen among them. Some patients are in the ICU care and ventilator support.

Director at Patan Academy of Health Science, Dr. Bishnu Prasad Sharma also said the patients infected with the virus have shown symptoms of late.

“Those infected with coronavirus and admitted in the hospital were asymptomatic, but now they have the symptoms as common cold and fever,” he said, adding that among 15 persons admitted in the hospital, three have common symptoms.

Among the infected ones, seven are the Indian nationals. They also have a mild fever and the common cold.

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