Climbing mountains requires great deal of psychological, physical preparation: Fiamoncini

Thaneswar Guragai

June 22, 2019

7 MIN READ

Climbing mountains requires great deal of psychological, physical preparation: Fiamoncini
  • 370
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    370
    Shares

KATHMANDU: Passion for mountaineering and constant pursuit for self-improvement in everything that life offers are two guiding forces for Moeses Fiamoncini, a 39-year-old climber.

After having lived in Portugal for six years, the former business administrator gathered everything he needed in a backpack and decided to explore the world. Since then, he has never stopped exploring. He has toured over 80 countries, has lived in four nations on different continents (United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Nepal). He has climbed as many mountains as a sane human being could reasonably climb. He has many friends and has gone through a variety of experiences.

Born in Paraná-Brazil, the sportsman Moeses is passionate about nature and has refined and aesthetic hobbies such as reading, practicing Yoga and meditation. Moeses, a fond lover of healthy food and active lifestyle, likes to explore the gastronomy and culture of each and every place he visits.

He has successfully climbed Manaslu, the eighth highest mountain in the world, located in the Himalayan mountain range in September 2018. After that, he has climbed Mt Everest on 23rd May 2019. He also ascended Mt Lhotse (8300m) without carrying any oxygen cylinder and no Sherpas accompanied him in scaling that mountain.

We know now as an adult how interesting the stories of adventure and valor used to be in our childhood. Some of the incidents, though appear ‘normal’ when we grow up, were great feats of achievements to boast about in the circle of friends. Similarly, there are ‘moments’ in human history which make all of us proud and they leave lasting impressions throughout our life. Our own ‘intense experience’ in the journey of life has a strong bearing on whatever we decide for ourselves or for others who are dependent upon us.

The story of Moeses is no less inspiring to draw lessons from his life. At the age of ten, he wanted to live the life full of great adventure and he dreamt to become an explorer. Almost three decades later, he realized that dream when he conquered Manasalu — the eighth highest mountain in the world. Moisses gets nostalgic and says, “I was very young, maybe 10, I organized an ‘expedition’ with the help of other friends to climb a mountain located near to my house, in the interior of Paraná. When I reached the top of the mountain, I wondered what lies beyond this horizon. At that moment it struck me that I wanted to be an explorer,” he expresses himself with elation.

Those were frustrating days, Moisses shares, even as he was busy working in his office, his childhood dream continued to push ahead. It never stopped even while he was asleep.  He recounts how he desperately wanted to break free from the confines of his office to realize his childhood dream and he ventured out to explore the streaks of adventurism and to quench an insatiable spirit of exploration by opting for mountaineering. Everything was ‘upside down’ to begin with but he got used to such kind of unpredictable lifestyle as there was an element of adventurism involved in that. It was 2008 when Moeses decided to take a chance to realize his childhood dream. He began his training to become an expert explorer and accomplished mountaineer. He visited many countries, met many people and confronted many cultures. He lived in monasteries, hiked, surfed, and finally, in 2018, he scaled Manaslu.

Over the years Moeses acquired a length of experience in trekking and climbing around the world. He trekked in remote areas and lived in diverse cultures. It was a real calling of his ‘soul’, if one may call it. He is not reckless, nor disorganized. He is extremely organized in his disorganized destinations of life and he loves it because he is an explorer. He sets out for travel with not pre-defined routes and no fixed destinations. He is a ‘nomad’ living a modern lifestyle. And it has been 11 years he has been traveling all the while and sleeping in the lap of the Himalayas with no home of his own as if entire universe belongs to him with limitless expansion instead of being anchored to any confinement. “It is not a fancy idea that drives you to climb a mountain,” Moeses cautions and adds further, “Climbing a mountain requires a great deal of psychological and physical preparation.”

It takes just three words to sum up his life-time experience of mountaineering: overcoming one’s own limitation of self, the right focus, and love for what you are at. With these mantras of life, Moeses Fiamoncini with his indefatigable spirit is all motivated to take up another trip and go for trekking next destinations.

 

Just In